07/06/2014 Jonathan Taylor

Did Kliff Kingsbury, Texas Tech head football coach, violate Title IX by dismissing Nigel Bethel?

[dropshadowbox align=”center” effect=”lifted-both” width=”full” height=”” background_color=”#ffffff” border_width=”1″ border_color=”#dddddd” ]Update: Good news – Nigel Bethel has been reinstated. [/dropshadowbox]

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

– Title IX

Nigel Bethel is a Texas Tech football player who recently had his scholarship pulled and was dismissed from the football team because he defended himself against a female basketball player named Amber Battle. According to KCBD News (an NBC affiliate), Battle made a public statement admitting her involvement:

During a pickup basketball game on June 28, I was involved in an incident with Texas Tech football player Nigel Bethel. I initiated the first contact and I take full responsibility for my actions. I want to take this time to apologize to Nigel, the Texas Tech community, my teammates, coaches and fans.

Nothing I can say can truly repair the harm I have already caused. I did not represent the Double T like I am supposed to and I promise to hold myself to a higher standard from here on.

According to ESPN reporter Max Olson the man who made the decision to dismiss Nigel Bethel was head coach Kliff Kingsbury. Referring to the deliberation process, Olson stated, “No matter what the circumstances of the incident were, Nigel Bethel punched a woman, and that was enough for Texas Tech and for Kliff Kingsbury.”

No matter what the circumstances. In other words, for Kliff Kingsbury sex was the sole determining factor in pulling a young man’s scholarship and dismissing him from the team.

Here’s another angle: one of the reasons Title IX was originally implemented was because women’s sports were underfunded and undervalued. The reason? Relative to men, women were deemed weak and helpless, and hence unfit for sports.

And now here we are, 42 years after Title IX was passed, and a female basketball player is now being portrayed as weak and helpless when it comes to taking equal responsibility for a fight that she started. Kinda goes against the whole concept of “a woman can do anything a man can do,” doesn’t it?

So which is it? Perhaps we should ask Texas Tech Director of Athletics Kirby Hocutt if women should even be playing sports at all, since they are apparently so weak and helpless that men – like the parents of children – should take strict responsibility for their actions.

Jonathan Taylor
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Jonathan Taylor

Jonathan is Title IX For All's founder, editor, web designer, and database developer. Hailing from Texas, he makes a mean red beans n' rice and is always interested to learn new things.
Jonathan Taylor
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About the Author

Jonathan Taylor Jonathan is Title IX For All's founder, editor, web designer, and database developer. Hailing from Texas, he makes a mean red beans n' rice and is always interested to learn new things.

Comments (3)

  1. Equality is the goal when it is convenient…. Had this guy said that women were unfit for football he would have been fired- but here he is ruining this man’s life for defending himself. I will never support this team.

     
  2. thebibosez

    Although it is probably too late for Mr. Bethel to continue his football career, I hope he has the gumption and resources to sue the University and file a title IX complaint. The antiquated anti-male “chivalry” of that coach should be utterly destroyed.

     

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